Star Wars, Myth and Marketing

West Australian press (newspaper and radio) enjoyed the point of view of Star Wars from a consumer culture perspective. Thanks to the ECU Public Relations team for their support in getting me in touch with reporters who gave air time to serious research about a subject that quite a few people take very seriously…

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In a suburb far, far away – Senior academic at Joondalup’s Edith Cowan University, Dr Nathalie Collins confronts her nemesis, Yoda. Picture: Michael O’Brien The West Australian

 

New Journal Article Published: “Civitas and Communitas”

Recently the Journal of Global Marketing Science¬†published a special issue on Philosophy and Marketing. Professor Jamie Murphy and I were published in that journal with our article: “Communitas and civitas: an idiographic model of consumer collectives”

The article is part of a two part conceptual journey into consumer collectives. Also called Brand Communities, Consumer Tribes, Subcultures of Consumption and other such names, these communities have products at their centre and act a lot like religious communities. This article draws a comparison between religious communities¬†(as it is defined by American James Carse) and these¬†consumption communities. The comparison explores the tension between the Civitas (or producer/church) and the Communitas (congregation/consumer collective). The two groups do not have the same aims; rather their goals produce a social energy or “game” which generates meaning for all the players.

The contribution of this article is the development of a model of communal consumption behaviour which is mapped to a particular model of the way religion works. Parallels between consumption behaviour and religion have become increasingly common since Apple Computer introduced the approach in the mid 1980s. This article also highlights the work of James Carse, an American scholar of Philosophy and Religion.