The best job you will ever have, seriously.

I was recently invited to speak at the National Association for Prospective Student Advisors, Australia Conference. The convenors gave me carte blanche on what I could discuss, so I decided to talk about how recruiting students into Vocational and higher Education was  the best job someone could ever have. but just because it is the best job, doesn’t mean it’s easy. Like most jobs requiring emotional labour, it is rewarding, but taxing. My talk was actually about the different types of authenticity, and their effectiveness expressing a value proposition. However the theory was delivered through the lens of my experience as a recruiter. The video was taken on a iPhone, so it isn’t the best quality, but feel free to watch and share.

Published: Book chapter on a folk taxonomy of fan communities

I am proud to see that a book chapter I have been working on with Dr Jamie Murphy has been published. The chapter was inspired by our annoyance at the lack of technical terminology for the segmentation of fans in consumer communities. What is the difference, for example, between a maven and a geek? And why are they different? As we conducted research into this area I felt the need for the kind of characterisation that is so prevalent in other kinds of customer analyses.

I loved exploring the genesis of different terms and demonstrating examples. Working with Jamie is always an adventure, and I look forward to further collaborations with him. Jamie is a sharp editor and an enthusiast for research and life in general. I have so much gratitude for all the opportunities he has brought to me over the years – so thanks Jamie, for this and so many other things.

As for me personally – for some things I am a geek and for some a maven. Usually I am an evangelist – or hater! I saw myself in so many characters in this chapter which is part of what made it fun to write. I hope those who read it have a good time too.

 

Honouring inspiring Australian Businesswomen

I recently had the privilege of judging the national Telsta Businesswoman of the Year awards. Doing so allowed me to take a peek into the working and personal lives of some very accomplished women in Australian business. I was inspired, not only by their accomplishments, but by the organisations that gave them the opportunities, support, training, education and chances to excel…and to make mistakes.

The experience made me reflect on two things. First, that inspiring individuals rarely exist in a vacuum. Understanding the give and take of success is very important, especially the higher you soar.

And secondly, that my employer of fourteen years, and my manager (over over ten) are integral to my success. No one person, or organisation, is perfect. And certainly the greatest gift they have given me is recognising that in me. Not every endeavour leads to great results. But every failure, or mediocre result, is a step toward those things that work really well, that delight us, that make a difference to our bottom line, and to our overall mission.

All of the women’s entries I read had challenges, they all had support, and getting where they were was a group effort. I wish them all the best, as well as their organisations, and all of the people in their future whom they will help spur forward toward success.

Conference Presentation: WA Hackers Conference

I an so pleased to have my presentation on “Hacking as an Infinite Game” accepted to the Western Australian HWAHKONackers Conference (WAHKON). Although hacking tends to focus on computing activity, it is an umbrella term for people who are expert, innovative and have a joy for what they do. In casual parlance, the word “hacker” mistaken for criminal behaviour – but those are actually crackers – big difference.  My talk is going to be about the metaphor of the infinite game is so suitable for describing the Hacker ethic. With the Australian government’s recent focus on technology and innovation, the kind of people coming to this conference are just fascinating. I am looking forward to being around them, learning from them, and allowing them to let me play their infinite game.

Star Wars, Myth and Marketing

West Australian press (newspaper and radio) enjoyed the point of view of Star Wars from a consumer culture perspective. Thanks to the ECU Public Relations team for their support in getting me in touch with reporters who gave air time to serious research about a subject that quite a few people take very seriously…

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In a suburb far, far away – Senior academic at Joondalup’s Edith Cowan University, Dr Nathalie Collins confronts her nemesis, Yoda. Picture: Michael O’Brien The West Australian