Honouring inspiring Australian Businesswomen

I recently had the privilege of judging the national Telsta Businesswoman of the Year awards. Doing so allowed me to take a peek into the working and personal lives of some very accomplished women in Australian business. I was inspired, not only by their accomplishments, but by the organisations that gave them the opportunities, support, training, education and chances to excel…and to make mistakes.

The experience made me reflect on two things. First, that inspiring individuals rarely exist in a vacuum. Understanding the give and take of success is very important, especially the higher you soar.

And secondly, that my employer of fourteen years, and my manager (over over ten) are integral to my success. No one person, or organisation, is perfect. And certainly the greatest gift they have given me is recognising that in me. Not every endeavour leads to great results. But every failure, or mediocre result, is a step toward those things that work really well, that delight us, that make a difference to our bottom line, and to our overall mission.

All of the women’s entries I read had challenges, they all had support, and getting where they were was a group effort. I wish them all the best, as well as their organisations, and all of the people in their future whom they will help spur forward toward success.

Conference Presentation: WA Hackers Conference

I an so pleased to have my presentation on “Hacking as an Infinite Game” accepted to the Western Australian HWAHKONackers Conference (WAHKON). Although hacking tends to focus on computing activity, it is an umbrella term for people who are expert, innovative and have a joy for what they do. In casual parlance, the word “hacker” mistaken for criminal behaviour – but those are actually crackers – big difference.  My talk is going to be about the metaphor of the infinite game is so suitable for describing the Hacker ethic. With the Australian government’s recent focus on technology and innovation, the kind of people coming to this conference are just fascinating. I am looking forward to being around them, learning from them, and allowing them to let me play their infinite game.

Star Wars, Myth and Marketing

West Australian press (newspaper and radio) enjoyed the point of view of Star Wars from a consumer culture perspective. Thanks to the ECU Public Relations team for their support in getting me in touch with reporters who gave air time to serious research about a subject that quite a few people take very seriously…


In a suburb far, far away – Senior academic at Joondalup’s Edith Cowan University, Dr Nathalie Collins confronts her nemesis, Yoda. Picture: Michael O’Brien The West Australian


Book Chapter Published in the Review of Marketing Research

I am delighted to advise that my colleagues Jamie Murphy, Dick Mizerski, Hanna Glaebe and myself just had out book chapter Identifying Customer Evangelists published in the Review of Marketing Research. This special edition, focusing on brand meaning and management, was edited by Deborah McInnes – a researcher on whose work much of mine is based. She is brilliant, and her work influential and important.

The book chapter takes the first step in formalising an approach to identifying customer evangelists in a quantitative way – which helps with the stronger push toward analytics and big data in marketing. The research demonstrates that it is possible to identify customer evangelists through key questions in a survey (as their buying behaviour may not differentiate them from other customers) and therefore, once identified, perhaps harness their word of mouth power for various brand-related activities.

This book chapter was also the final piece of research directly related to and incorporated in my doctoral thesis. All of my co-authors on this work not only were colleagues in this paper; they supported me in completing my PhD. I would like to acknowledge their support on both this paper and my research.

I am honoured to address the Australian Human Resources Institute (Perth)

This month I will be presenting to HR practitioners and leaders in Perth about authenticity and organisational voice. The summary of the talk is below.

– – – – – – –

Dr Nathalie Collins, Manager of Strategic Business Development, Edith Cowan University, will be presenting ‘Maintaining an Authentic Voice through difficult organisational change.’

HR professionals are often tasked with delivering communications and managing change which is directed at Executive level with an organisational voice. During this talk, Dr Nathalie Collins will draw relevant examples from her research into authenticity and management/messaging to stimulate discussions on effective ways to be perceived as authentic by your audience.

The positives of authenticity range from increasing the credibility of the message to reducing stress on workers who have to deliver corporate messaging. But authenticity is a slippery concept; what does it mean? And how can something so subjective still be applied?

Nathalie’s development of the 360 Degree Authenticity Framework attempts to address authenticity in a practical applied way, while still drawing from its basis in philosophy, psychology, anthropological, sociology and tourism.

For more information about the Institute visit their web site.